A CALL TO ACTION FOR A CLIMATE CONSERVATION CORPS

By Governor Jay Inslee May 2019

A Call to Action for a Climate Conservation Corps

“The Climate Corps will organize the greatest renewable resource of all – the talent and energy of the American people – to work together in cities and rural communities, in our great parks and public lands, and all around the planet. It will give young people the opportunity to serve in the domestic and global effort to secure a healthy future, and will provide Americans of all ages and backgrounds with education, skills, job-training and employment opportunities to thrive in building our new clean energy economy.

 3 Elements to the Climate Corps:

  1. the National Climate Service Corps, will give young Americans the opportunity to serve in creating sustainability solutions in their own communities. They’ll get right to work changing the world with their hands, even as they earn new skills to assist in future employment…recovering and rebuilding resilient communities in the face of increasingly devastating climate disasters.
  2.  a Global Climate Service Corps will give Americans the opportunity to conduct a tour of service overseas working side by side with local partners, as they build expertise in climate mitigation and resilience, clean water, and sustainable economic development.
  3. a Green Careers Network, which will build on national service to focus on the challenge of permanent job creation in a clean energy economy. This effort will expand investments in skills-training, apprenticeships and on-the-job education to award credentials and build career ladders for long-term employment in good jobs.

No one feels the urgency of this mounting climate crisis more acutely than young people.

The concept of a Climate Corps is one that appeals to Americans of all ages – receiving over 60 percent support, including majorities of both Democrats and Independents, according to polling done by the think tank Data for Progress.

January 20, 2021

 

“It’s really a wonder that I haven’t dropped all my ideals, because they seem so absurd and impossible to carry out. Yet I keep them, because in spite of everything, I still believe that people are really good at heart.”
Anne Frank

“You can cut all the flowers but you cannot keep Spring from coming.”
Pablo Neruda

 

 

 

From Connect Hear

Tips for Communicating with a Deaf or Hearing Impaired Person

“Have you ever interacted with a Deaf person in your surroundings? I bet you wondered how do they survive in a world without the ability to hear. In Pakistan, more than 10 Million people have some level of hearing loss and they are still discriminated against.

Our CEO, Azima Dhanjee, is a Child of Deaf Adults (CODA). Growing up, she was the interpreter for her parents at all instances and her unavailability led to her parents’ missing out on opportunities. It always bothered her to witness her parents’ not being able to communicate independently. This became the motivation behind starting Connect Hear

Tips for Communicating With Deaf People

Blog for Communicating with a Deaf Person

12 Tips for Communicating with a Deaf Person (But really you should go to their website it has picture and is much clearer!) Connect Hear 

  1. Use a normal speaking pattern. Over-enunciating makes it hard for a Deaf person to read your lips.
  2. Write it down if necessary. Some people are better at reading lips than others
  3. Look directly at the person you are communicating with. If you look away, a Deaf person may miss what you are saying.
  4. Speak in a normal tone of voice. Since a Deaf person cannot hear you, raising your voice doesn’t help.
  5. Try to find your own way to communicate. Although you can’t talk to one another, there are many other ways for you to communicate. You can use a pen and paper or even text to have a conversation.
  6. Don’t be afraid to ask a Deaf person to repeat themselves. The goal is clear communication and understanding. Asking to repeat something has better results and less frustration – for both parties.
  7. Be patient and inclusive. Imagine you are trying to understand a conversation that you want to be involved in, but are unable due to the conversation’s speed, number of people talking at the same time, and/or not being able to share your ideas with the group. By allowing enough time and considering the communication needs of everyone in the group, you ensure that everyone can participate fully.
  8. In a group conversation, take turns speaking. A Deaf person can only look at one individual at a time.
  9. Be clear and concise. Saying “I’m fine” can have many different meanings with subtle differences. For example “I’m fine” can mean
    • I feel well
    • I feel the same way I always feel
    • I’m way too busy to know how I feel
    • Don’t bother me
    • Did you want to know about my emotional or physical well-being?
    • You don’t care how I feel or would have stopped walking to listen
  10. Use body language and gestures. Deaf and hard of hearing people who use sign language are accustomed to using their hands and face to communicate. Gesturing and using clear facial expressions when speaking to a person with hearing challenges can help them understand what you’re saying. “Miming” is also acceptable if it helps to get a certain point across, but remember that mime is not the same as sign language.
  11. Accept that awkward moments happen. Even if you follow all of the above tips while speaking to a Deaf or hard of hearing person, they’ll probably still misunderstand you at some point. Don’t feel bad or stop. Just repeat yourself and continue the conversation. If they’re having trouble understanding a certain word or phrase, try using a different word, rephrasing what you said, or typing it on your phone.
  12. Resist the urge to give up when misunderstandings happen. A little effort on your part can make a big difference to someone, and chances are that you’ll benefit from the experience, too.

HSDC Services 

 

No matter who you’re interacting with, the most important thing to remember is that you should work together with the other person to create an accessible environment. Keep in mind that deaf and hard of hearing people who are part of the Deaf community may have certain cultural and etiquette differences that appear while communicating.

Never say “I’ll tell you later”, “never mind”, or “it doesn’t matter” to a deaf or hard of hearing person. Almost all deaf and hard of hearing people have heard these phrases, or variations of them, countless times while being excluded from information or conversations. Make an effort to include everybody.

How Should I Communicate?

Don’t assume anything. Not all deaf and hard of hearing people prefer to communicate in the same way. Some might prefer to speak, some might prefer to sign, and some might prefer to write. Ask them how they want to proceed. They probably know exactly what they want from you.

If you speak out loud and they don’t understand, try writing on a piece of paper or typing on your phone. If you write or type with a deaf person, do not look down on their English skills. Remember that many deaf and hard of hearing people are deprived of language as children and that English is a second language for many Deaf people.

If you know American Sign Language and you’re talking to a deaf or hard of hearing person who uses sign language, you should try to sign yourself. Even if you feel nervous or unskilled, the person you’re talking to will appreciate your effort, and they’ll let you know if they prefer to communicate a different way.

Want to learn American Sign Language? Check out our Resources page.

Get Their Attention

Deaf and hard of hearing people process information visually, and it is much easier to communicate if you wait until they look at you before you begin. Get their attention. That way they can see your mouth, facial expressions, and body language.

If you need to get the attention of somebody who can’t hear you, try the following:

  • Wave your hand in their line of sight. This is how Deaf people get the attention of one another.
  • Tap them lightly on the shoulder.
  • If they have their back turned away from you, get the attention of somebody in their line of sight, and have that person point at you.
  • If you know the Deaf person well, you can take advantage of the power of vibration. Tap a table or stomp on the floor. Use this method only if necessary.
  • If you need to get the attention of many deaf and hard of hearing people at once, turn the lights in the room off and on a couple times.

Body Language and Gestures

Deaf and hard of hearing people are visual. Those who are a part of the Deaf Community, especially, are experts at reading body language. Gesturing and using clear facial expressions when speaking to a person with hearing differences will help them understand what you’re saying.

Miming is also okay if it helps to get a certain point across, but remember that mime is not the same as sign language.

Using Spoken Language

Establish the topic

People who are deaf or hard of hearing sometimes miss individual words or phrases during speech and rely on their knowledge of what’s being discussed to fill in the gaps. However, conversations often change subject without warning, especially in groups.

If the topic of conversation changes, pausing to acknowledge the change and state the new subject can be a big help. Something as simple as, “Speaking of the weather…” is often enough.

Lipreading

Do not ask a deaf or hard of hearing person if they can lipread. Many deaf and hard of hearing people are reluctant to say that they can lipread because of the myth that it allows for 100% understanding.

According to the National Association for the Deaf, “On average, even the most skilled lipreaders understand only 25% of what is said to them, and many individuals understand far less. Lipreading is most often used as a supplement to the use of residual hearing, amplification, or other assistive listening technology. Because lipreading requires some guesswork, very few deaf or hard of hearing people rely on lipreading alone for exchanges of important information.”

If you know that lipreading is happening, make sure that the other person can see your face, and follow these tips:

  • Don’t forget the importance of body language.
  • Keep your mouth and eyes visible. Don’t cover your mouth with your hands. Don’t eat or chew gum while you talk.
  • Maintain eye contact; try not to look around the room too much.
  • Face forward while speaking; don’t turn your back.
  • If you have a thick mustache or beard, keep in mind that you will be much harder to lipread.

Lighting is an important factor in making sure the other person can see your face. If possible, try to communicate in bright spaces. Do not sit or stand directly in front of a light source, as that will create a shadow over your face that makes lipreading extremely difficult.

Speak clearly and enunciate

Speaking clearly and enunciating can help a deaf or hard of hearing person understand you. However, it does not mean shouting and speaking extremely slowly. Why?

  • Understanding speech is not always a volume problem. Many people with hearing differences can’t understand speech well even if the volume of the voice they’re listening to is satisfactory. This is because of damage in the inner ear that causes distortion, which loudness can’t fix.
  • Changing the way you speak makes you harder to understand. Many people with hearing differences use common speech rhythms to help them anticipate what other people are saying.

Group Conversations and Meetings

Conversations with more than three or four participants are difficult situations for deaf and hard of hearing people. The back and forth nature of a group conversation can be hard to follow and mentally exhausting.

If you are planning a formal meeting, be proactive in planning for accessibility.

If your conversation is informal, be proactive in asking the participating deaf or hard of hearing people how you can make the situation accessible for them. You may want to do this in private so they feel comfortable being honest. Three easy tips to make any group conversation more accessible:

  • Established the topic, as explained above.
  • Speak one at a time.
  • Raise your hand before you speak, and wait for any deaf or hard of hearing people to look at you before beginning.

Awkward moments

Even if you follow all of the above tips while speaking to a deaf or hard of hearing person, they might still misunderstand you at some point. Don’t stop. Just repeat yourself and continue the conversation. If they’re having trouble understanding a certain word or phrase, try using a different word, rephrasing what you said, or typing it in your phone.

Resist the urge to give up when misunderstandings happen. A little effort on your part can make a big difference to somebody else, and you’ll benefit from the experience, too.

This Summer in M’Finda Kalunga Garden Intrepid Volunteers Kepy the Garden Open

Working and welcoming and Keeping Safe Practices. Thank you volunteers!

 

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Center for an Urban Future Report: Ideas From Experts - Never Been a Better Time

A GREEN PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM FOR NYC: 40 IDEAS FROM EXPERTS

Full plan here

A Green Public Works Program for NYC: 40 Ideas from Experts To understand how New York might take advantage of federal investment to create jobs and help the city mitigate and adapt to the effects of climate change, CUF asked city

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Neighbors Looking Out: Belgian Block Removals, the Coming Digging Machine and Parking Inside the Park

Thanks to neighbors Jeffrey and Tessa here are photos removing the Belgian Blocks. The MTA Contractor Cruz promises these will return after the dig. Parks Department workers also say there are plenty of these stored for Park use.

 

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Educational Alliance now Open for Enrollment: “Project Contact Outpatient Program”

From the Educational Alliance:

“Dear Community Members, We would like to inform you that the Project Contact Outpatient Program is open for enrollment. Please see the flyer below for additional program and referral information. Best, The CRW Admissions Team”

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American Kestrel Hunting Nearby Sara Roosevelt Park

An American Kestral was caught on camera by Colleen Corkery neighbor and M’Finda Kalunga volunteer.

Katie Leung from the WildLife Unit of the Parks Department ”

“…these feature an American kestrel. I think you’re also lucky to see a kestrel with its meal in talon!”

 

Colleen wrote, ”

Here are pics…when it

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Turtles Move (in November) to Winter Quarters – M’Finda Kalunga Garden

Ted and Jose get the turtles ready for their winter vacation home.

 

 

Pratt Stanton ParkHouse Reimagined As Community Gathering & Environmental Hub

From the Stanton Task Force:

Students from the Interior Design program at Pratt Institute offered their fresh thinking and design skills to our community vision for the Stanton Building in SDR Park.

Brief presentations by these Fall 2020 students of their designs for the Stanton Building were followed by a dialogue with community members. For

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